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papers:soliciting_charity_contributions_the_parlance_of_asking_for_money1 [2018/05/30 21:52] (current)
david created
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 +====Soliciting Charity Contributions:​ The Parlance of Asking for Money1====
  
 +Benson, Peter L.; Catt, Viola L., (1978). Soliciting Charity Contributions:​ The Parlance of Asking for Money1. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 84--95.
 +
 +**Keywords**: ​
 +
 +**Discipline**: ​
 +
 +**Type of evidence**: Field-exp-charity
 +
 +**Related tools**: [[tools:​High arousalurgent advert|High arousal/​urgent advert]]
 +
 +**Related theories**: ​
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 +**Related critiques**: ​
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 +**Charity target**: ​
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 +**Donor population**: ​
 +\\
 +\\
 +===Paper summary===
 +
 +
 +\\
 +===Discussion===
 +
 +Abstract:
 +>​Investigated the effects of 3 verbally mediated variables on financial contributions in a door-to-door charity campaign. The relationship of race to contributions was also observed by using both Black and White Ss. 120 Black and 120 White Ss were randomly assigned to 1 of 8 verbal appeals in a 2 (High vs Low Dependency) by 2 (Internal vs External Causal Locus of Need) by 2 (Social Responsibility vs Good Feeling as a reason for giving) factorial design. Whites contributed more than Blacks, the external locus of need condition produced more giving than the internal condition, and persons who heard the "good feeling"​ reason donated more than those in the "​social responsibility"​ condition. Additionally,​ a significant Causal Locus of Need by Reason for Giving interaction was found. The combination of external locus of need and "good feeling"​ was considerably more productive of contributions than the other 3 combinations.
 +\\
 +===Evaluation===
 +
 +
 +\\
 +This paper has been added by David Reinstein
  • papers/soliciting_charity_contributions_the_parlance_of_asking_for_money1.txt
  • Last modified: 2018/05/30 21:52
  • by david